What Debt Reduction Strategies Do You Use?

by on November 20, 2012

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It’s been just over 5 years since I created the free spreadsheet-based Debt Reduction Calculator, and over that time I’ve received numerous emails not only from individuals who are using it, but also from debt relief firms who are using the spreadsheet to help their clients.

I’d like to use this blog post to provide a place to answer questions and hopefully get you to share your success stories and ideas. More specifically, I’d like to find out what debt reduction strategies people are using.

The Debt Snowball Effect

The debt reduction calculator was designed to simulate the debt snowball effect and allow you to easily select and experiment with different payoff strategies.

What’s the Snowball Effect? Let’s say your budget allows you $400 to pay towards your debts (not counting your mortgage in this case). If the total of your minimum loan and credit card payments comes to $270, you are left with a snowball of $130 that you can throw at a debt of your choice.

Initial Snowball Amount

Let’s say you begin by targeting Auto Loan #1 that has a minimum payment of $30. After you pay it off, your new total minimum payment would decrease to $240, so your snowball will increase to $160. Picture a snowball rolling down a mountain picking up speed and increasing in size. That is how the “Debt Snowball Effect” got its name.

Avalanche vs. Snowball

The order that you decide to pay off your debts is very important. It can mean the difference between thousands of dollars. In the example above, the difference between using the Snowball and Avalanche method ends up being almost $3000 in interest.

1. Highest Interest First (Avalanche)

Debt Reduction Strategy Options

For the mathematically inclined, the fastest way to pay off your debts is using the “Highest Interest Rate First” strategy. Regardless of the balance on the card (and assuming no extra fees), if one charges 10% interest and another charges 20%, you’ll pay off the cards fastest by working on the one with the 20% rate first.

Combining the Avalanche Method with paying the bare minimum on all but your currently targeted debts results in the fastest payoff possible.

2. Lowest Balance First (Snowball)

People may get frustrated if they don’t see success right away, so throwing a little snowball at your biggest debt might not be the best option. This may be one of the reasons why Dave Ramsey advocates the “Lowest Balance First” method.

If you can knock out a couple easy debts, the psychological momentum of early success can help you stick to your goals.

Play it Smart – Customize Your Strategy

If your highest rates coincide with your lowest balances, then count yourself lucky. You’ll get the power of the Avalanche and still be able to see some early success by wiping out the easy stuff first.

You don’t need to use these strategies blindly. The Debt Reduction Calculator makes it easy to choose your own order to pay off your debts using the Custom column.

For example, let’s say you generally prefer the Lowest Balance First approach but Student Loan #1 has a balance of $4900 at 4% interest, and Auto Loan #2 has a balance of $5000 at 12%.

Debt Snowball Custom Order Example

The Student Loan as the lower balance but if you just swap the order of those two debts, as indicated in the Custom order column (with lowest being paid off first), you’d save about $750 in interest. In my opinion, this is a case where it’s better to target Auto Loan #2 before the student loan, even though the student loan has the lower balance.

On the other hand, if you prefer the Avalanche approach but want to experience an early success, you could target Auto Loan #1 first, then proceed Card #2, Card #1, etc. That would decrease the first payoff hurdle from 49 months to 22 months. Of course, you’d also end up paying $1000 more in interest.

Consider these types of opportunity costs when you are deciding on the order to pay off your debts.

There may also be other factors to consider besides the Balance, Rate and Total Interest Paid. I can think of a few, but I’d like to hear what you think (please comment below).

Balance Transfers and Consolidation

A balance transfer involves moving the balance of one credit card, usually one having a high interest rate, to another card that has a lower rate. Perhaps you got some junk mail with a credit card offer of 0% interest for 3 months. Many people jump on the balance transfer bandwagon so that they can afford to continue spending at their current rate, and that just leads to getting into MORE debt. Also, applying for additional credit cards could hurt your credit score.

If you are capable of resisting the temptations and spending that got you into the debt mess in the first place, then a balance transfer may be a legitimate debt reduction strategy.

Why? Because reducing the amount of interest and fees that you are paying allows more of your budgeted $500 to go towards paying off the balance due.

Debt Consolidation

Debt consolidation is based on the idea of transferring the balance of your debts into a single loan with a lower interest rate. Be a smart consumer and read up on all the pros and cons. See the list of resources in my debt consolidation article.

Debt Snowflaking

The debt reduction calculator has evolved over time as users request different features. Some of the changes were implemented right away because the benefit was obvious. An example of that was adding an “Additional Payment” column to allow a person to include an occasional extra payment beyond their normal scheduled amount. I wrote an article about that a while back titled “What is Debt Snowflaking“?

Emphasis on Credit Repair

Another major update was the creation of the Credit Repair Edition for the case where the primary goal was improving a credit rating rather than paying everything off as fast as possible. The concept for that is based on the idea that a credit rating has to do with reducing your Balance-to-Credit-Limit Ratio.

So, instead of waiting until a credit card is completely paid off to start applying the snowball to the next debt, you may decide to reduce the balance to 50% of the credit limit and then move on to the next card.

What Strategies Do You Use?

Have you been using the Debt Reduction Calculator? If so, please take the time to share your experience. How has the calculator helped you? What strategy or strategies have you used?

Do you have any other questions about how to use the spreadsheet?

Disclaimer: This article is intended for educational and informational use only and not as professional financial advice.

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Jon Wittwer November 28, 2012 at 12:37 pm

I got an email today from somebody asking about comparing paying off debt to investing in something like a mutual fund. There are important things to consider besides just comparing interest rates, but if you want to run some numbers to estimate interest gained via an investment, you can use the following savings calculator spreadsheet:

http://www.vertex42.com/Calculators/savings-interest-calculator.html

Reply

Cencal February 18, 2013 at 6:05 pm

I have been using your spreadsheet for the past few weeks and its great!!! Thanks much!

Anyway to incorporate a 0%, or even better….multiple 0% offers, into the debt calculator to see how it would work to replace higher interest balances on cards?

Reply

Jon Wittwer February 19, 2013 at 11:12 am

@Cencal … yes, that would be possible. A column could be added to the Creditor Information Table to specify the number of months for the 0% period. A new “Zero% for n Months” row would then be added in the Payment Schedule under the “Rate:” row to reference the value from the Creditor Information Table. The Interest calculations in the PaymentSchedule worksheet would need to be modified to set the interest to 0 if the “No.” column is within the 0% period. I can send you a copy of the file with this already done if you email me.

Reply

James June 10, 2013 at 6:05 pm

Is there a way to expand the sheet to include more than 20 creditors? Unfortunately, I need to expand it to acommidate around 40 creditors.

Reply

Jon Wittwer June 11, 2013 at 1:09 pm

I have a version that allows up to 40 creditors. Contact me via email if you want me to email a copy. http://www.vertex42.com/about.html

Reply

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